NovaScan's Dr. John Shell to Present at NIH Sponsored Conference

NovaScan Senior Scientist John Shell, Ph.D. has been selected to present in a poster session at a Special Topics Conference onHealthcare Innovations and Point of Care Technologies, co-sponsored by the National Institute of Health and IEEE. Dr. Shell will be presenting the “A Cancer Detection Device Using Multi-tiered Neural Networks for Improved Classification” during the poster session. In the poster and accompanying paper, Dr. Shell demonstrates how a neural network classification system led by assessment of the Cole relaxation frequency was employed by NovaScan to dramatically improve cancer detection in a mammography alternative.

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PROPEL Announces NovaScan as 2016 Business Plan Competition Winner

PROPEL Announces NovaScan as 2016 Business Plan Competition Winner

PROPEL, dedicated to increasing the number and success rate of early-stage life sciences companies in Illinois, announced on April 19 at the 2016 Innovation Showcase on Day 1 of iBIO IndEx that NovaScan won the 2016 PROPEL Business Plan Competition. Over 300 community members watched Craig Davis, CEO of NovaScan, give the winning presentation to life sciences financial investor judges. PROPEL awarded NovaScan a $15,000 cash prize at the end of Tuesday's event. Congratulations to Craig and the entire NovaScan team!

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National Science Foundation Award

National Science Foundation SBIR Awards

From 2010-2015, NovaScan recieved National Science Foundation SBIR awards for Phase I, Phase Ia, Phase II and Phase IIb.
($2,291,925 — including investor match)

Milwaukee Magazine

The Little Wand that Could

On a Thursday afternoon in November, a pea-sized lymph node from a mastectomy patient is brought into the crowded office of Dr. Gerald Smith, laboratory medical director at Aurora Sinai Medical Center. While the patient remains in the operating room, Smith freezes, slices, stains and microscopically examines the tissue for cancer. His conclusion will help determine if more of the woman's breast tissue or lymph nodes are removed. The process takes about 20 minutes.

Smtih's possible replacement for this procedure rests atop a table near his microscope—the FastPath Residual Cancer Probe. It's a cancer-detection device that inventor and physicist Bill Gregory, the chief science officer of NovaScan LLC, compares to a metal detector.

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